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Rick Flanagan – Playing in The Big Phat Horn Band

Rick Flanagan is a man passionate about rock & roll, rhythm & blues, and a big horn band.  After spending five years in Memphis, playing with some of the best, he returned to Kingston and formed The Big Phat Horn Band – and they have been entertaining folks ever since! Music played in this episode:   Chicago / “Does anybody really know what time it is?” / LP – Chicago IX – Chicago’s Greatest Hits ’69 – ’74 Best of

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WAFFLES
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Sweaters: WAFFLES!, December 15, 2018

Who’s got sweaters? We’ve got sweaters! And some creepy songs about sweaters, too! Matt and Marisa share songs about sweaters, and new classics from the holiday canon. Here’s the music for this episode: Last Christmas Coeur de Pirate The Sweater Meryn Cadell Walk Talk Syd Dale V-Neck Sweater Greyboy AllStars Hey Little Girl Thurston Harris Beautiful White The Pursuit of Happiness Sweaters Laurie Anderson All I Want Joni Mitchell Learn How to Knit Hawksley Workman Autumn Sweater Yo La Tengo Fingers Crossed Sweater Girls Record Collector The Planet Smashers Red Sweater The Aquabats In a Green Cotton Sweater Casiotone for the Painfully Alone Have Yourself a Merry Little Christmas Greg Dulli Independent Thief Kathleen Edwards I Can Sing Barenaked Ladies Sweater (Korean band) ??? Oh Susanna Little White Lies Sweater Weather Radio Radio Sweater Weather Kina Grannis Hating You for Christmas Everclear Christmas Card from a Hooker in Minneapolis Sam Brouwerman Sweater in the Lake Look Vibrant Sweater Day/Shelter Zwanie Johnson Silent Night William Shatner & Iggy Pop Cashmere Sweater Gloria Mann Clip Clop Charlotte Cornfield I’ll Be Home for Christmas Danielle Fricke

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Deliberations on Diaspora

Food Mobility: Bunny Chow

with Nathan Clemente, Henry Jeong, and Olivier Champagne Food is often an overlooked topic by many historians; indeed, for something that we can’t live without, many people take it for granted. Have you ever wondered how your favourite dishes came into being? Or how certain foods and ingredients have moved around the world? This podcast will discuss the history of the South African dish Bunny Chow, and in turn examine the larger picture of food mobility. Bunny Chow, a dish with local form of curry inside carved loaf of bread, is a reflection of transcultural fusion that occurs when a diasporic community meets the host community and its peoples. It is a reflection of necessary measures taken to get around the issues posed during the Apartheid,and also the symbol of solidarity among labourers of Indian and African backgrounds.

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Deliberations on Diaspora

“Love Thy Neighbour? Diaspora, Race and the Sitcom”

with Norees Gaspar andSahana Sivaneshan This podcast uses the BBC show Love Thy Neighbour to comment on the politicization of race in television. It will examine how the black diaspora in Britain after the end of WW2 and the arrival of the Windrush generation triggered a shift in British television towards racial diversity in sitcoms. Wewill comment on the effects these shows had on the black population and compare them to the popularity of prominent racially diverse shows that air today, such as Blackish and Dear White People. The central question we tackle is if these shows that comment on race are inherently political, and what pressures they face from their audiences. Love Thy Neighbour’s racist rhetoric exemplifies the claim of many showrunners of the 1960s and 70s, that they were using comedy to expose racist rhetoric, but instead ended up appealing to the racism present in society. *Warning this podcast will contain examples of derogatory and racist language*

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Deliberations on Diaspora

Warsan Shire’s “Teaching my Mother How to Give Birth,” a Diasporic Analysis

with Christina Anderson, Olivia Marve, and Lara Kahn This podcast mobilizes Warsan Shire’s book of poems titled “Teaching my Mother How to Give Birth” to explore how diasporic belonging intersects with her experiences of  gender, race, and sexuality as a first-generation immigrant from Somalia. We begin with  an overview of Shire’s personal background with migration and delve into how these  experiences of becoming a diasporic subject influence her writing. From there, we  discuss the meaning of diaspora and how we are able to use this understanding as an  analytical tool for reading Shire’s work and uncovering her diasporic subjectivity. We  use this foundation to inform our individual analysis of her poems “Fire,” “Birds,” and  “Conversations About Home,” and invite listeners to explore our own personal reactions to these works. In sum, this podcast explores the gendered nature of diaspora and exposes how Warsan Shire’struth about the nature of violence in war and her struggles with assimilation represent a particular articulation of diasporic experience.

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Deliberations on Diaspora

Joy Kogawa’s Poetry

with Bronte McMaster, IanMichalek, and Sarah Prowten Our podcast discusses Joy Kogawa’s collection of poems from her book “The Splintered Moon.” This episode explores Kogowa’s background and the history of Japanese-Canadian internment in Canada, while ultimately relating these topics to the content of her poems and our interpretations. We analyze four poems int his collection: Righteous Cleansing, I Know Who I Am, Communication, and We Had Not Seen It. In these poems, underlying themes of trauma, racism, and societal exclusion link numerous narratives relating to the larger study of diaspora. We touch on Canada’s hierarchical social system and show how the government reflected these values during Japanese-Canadian internment.Moreover, we examine how Kogowa’s writings serve as a form of activism and positive change moving forward, especially given the Canadian government’s offers of reconciliation in recent decades.

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Campus Beat: In the News-Holiday Shopping, Product Marketing Strategies & Why You Shouldn’t Give the Gift of Surveillance

Professors Monica LaBarge (Smith School of Business) and David Murakami Wood (Surveillance Studies) join us for a special Campus Beat: In the News episode.  LaBarge talks about the strategies various companies use to convince consumers to purchase their holiday products over those of their competitors.  Murakami Wood follows with a discussion about gift giving in the era of privacy issues and data leaks that suggests one should think twice before giving the gift of surveillance when you buy smart technologies for your loved ones this holiday season.

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popular podagogy
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Episode 7: Teachers as Change Leaders

Featuring special guests Dr. Rebecca Luce-Kapler and Dr. Dennis Sumara Friday, December 7th, 2018 Listen to Dr. Rebecca Luce-Kapler, Dean of the Queen’s Faculty of Education and Dr. Dennis Sumara, Dean of the Werklund School of Education as they discuss the past, present, and future of teaching on the eve of the Faculty’s 50th Anniversary Conference.

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Lee Airton

Assistant Professor, Faculty of Education Microinteractions and how gender functions in a particular space Dr. Lee Airton is an Assistant Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies in Education with the Faculty of Education. Their research program explores the micropolitics of gender and sexual diversity accommodation in K-12 and teacher education, with particular emphasis on the issues facing transgender and/or non-binary people in those settings. They recently published a popular press book entitled Gender: Your Guide – A gender-friendly primer on what to say, what to know, and what to do in the new gender culture. As an advocate, Dr. Airton founded They is My Pronoun and the No Big Deal Campaign. In 2017, they received the Youth Role Model of the Year Award from the Canadian Centre for Gender and Sexual Diversity. In this episode, Dr. Airton discusses their book Gender: Your Guide as a resource for public education and advice for someone unfamiliar with the new gender culture. They also comment on the history of transgender activism and the issues facing non-binary people, such as advocacy for access. Dr. Airton also explains their research into the implementation of legal protections against gender discrimination in the policies governing schools at Continue Reading

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