Category:

Rachel Kuzmich, PhD in Geography & Planning supervised by Dr Paul Treitz

Topic: Examining bird habitat structure across space and over time using remote sensing data. Overview: My research will contribute to an enhanced understanding of habitat occupancy by using airborne laser scanning to describe and quantify relevant habitat structure. It will also make a methodological contribution to the emerging field of ecoacoustics by developing and testing a method for using bird recording data captured at survey points in the field.

Posted On :
Category:

Megan Tucker, M.Ed in Education, supervised by Dr Elizabeth MacEachren

 Topic: Experiences that inspires one to be an Environmentalist Overview: The purpose of this research is to explore environmentalists’ perceptions and sense of oneness with the natural world. By listening to the stories of environmentalists, this study will explore participants’ significant life experiences, and the everlasting sensory impression of those experiences on current understanding of their sense of oneness with the natural world. Lastly, this study will explore the significance of environmentalists’ in sharing their personal stories.

Posted On :
Category:

Claudia Hirtenfelder, PhD in Geography & Planning, supervised by Drs Laura Cameron and Carolyn Prouse

Topic: Cast Out Urbanites: A comparative history and geography of how cows disappeared from Kingston and Cape Town Overview: Today, while certainly not absent in all cities, cows are invisible as lively beings in many urban areas in which they once lived, illustrating the changing multi-species nature of urbanisation. Historically, cows were present in urban settlements and were used by humans as sources of milk, meat, leather, and labour. While humans continue to use cows for much the same, the spatiality and scale of these relations has undergone dramatic changes. In order to understand how urbanisation is shaped through processes of multi-species inclusion and exclusion, this research aims to unpack how cows became absent in two cities, Cape Town (South Africa) and Kingston (Canada).

Posted On :

Zuhaib Mir, MSc in Epidemiology, supervised by Dr Patti Groome

Topic: Postoperative liver decompensation events following partial hepatectomy for hepatocellular carcinoma among patients with cirrhosis Overview: My research is focused on studying adverse outcomes after surgical resection of liver tumours. Specifically, the majority of patients with liver cancer also have underlying liver disease, called cirrhosis. So, the decision to remove the cancerous portion of their liver must also take into account the function of the remaining liver left behind

Posted On :
Category:

Jennifer Ritonja, PhD in Epidemiology, supervised by Dr Kristan Aronson

Topic: Night shift work, melatonin, and circadian gene methylation in the development of breast cancer Overview: Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women in Canada and globally. Breast cancer etiology is complex, and work environment as a risk factor is still poorly understood, particularly with respect to night shift work. It is estimated that 10-30% of the global working population are night shift workers. While research indicates that night shift work raises the risk of breast cancer, not all research is consistent, due to differences across studies. Further, it is still unclear how night work may make an individual more susceptible to breast cancer.

Posted On :