Putting Mining in its Place: Mining and Community Resistance in Canada

Date: November 21, 2019Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  Joan Kuyek Joan Kuyek has decades of experience helping to protect Canadian communities from the negative impacts of the mining industry. She will briefly share what she learned: how the Canadian industry is structured, how it maintains power, and how affected communities resist whether they want to stop a mine before it starts, to force governments to protect them, or to get an abandoned mine cleaned-up.

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The Canadian Federal Election: What Just Happened?

Date: October 31, 2019Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  Georgina Riel, Hugh Segal, Kyla Tienhaara, and Colin Grey, chaired by Jonathan Rose This episode is a recording of the October 31st 2019 SNID post-election panel analyzing the 2019 Canadian federal election. The panel featured Georgina Riel, (Kingston political commentator), Hugh Segal (Queen’s School of Policy Studies), Kyla Tienhaara (Global Development Studies, environmental specialist), and Colin Grey (Queen’s Law School, immigration law specialist), and was chaired by Jonathan Rose (Queen’s Department of Political Studies). 

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Financialization, Securitization and the ‘War’ on Caribbean Remittances

Date of Lecture: November 14, 2019; Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214; Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30; PM Speaker: Beverley Mullings, Queen’s University. Across the Caribbean diaspora remittances are a faithful source of capital that has been a vital social safety net and source of local economic investment for many individuals and communities. But recent efforts by governments to leverage control over these flows of financial capital threaten this lifeline in ways that constitute a ‘war’ on remittances. The growing interest of states, international organizations and financial investors in Caribbean remittance economies reflects an emerging mode of governance built upon the logics of financializaton that is blurring the relationship between finance and security. In this talk, I examine the impulses behind this emerging regulatory infrastructure by identifying the strategies, regulations and procedures at work in an emerging financialization/securitization nexus that is reinvigorating new forms of coloniality, imperial control and abandonment in the Caribbean. About the Speaker:  Beverley Mullings, Queen’s University Beverley Mullings is a professor in the Department of Geography and Planning at Queen’s. Her research is located within the field of feminist political economy and engages questions of labour, social transformation, neoliberalism, and the politics of gender, race and class in the Caribbean and its diaspora. She is interested in the long-term effects of neoliberalization in the Caribbean on Continue Reading

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We Are the Caretakers of Our Water

Date of Lecture: October 17, 2019Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  Poh-Gek Forkert, Queen’s University A small rural community and a nearby First Nations community combined forces to fight a proposal to expand a local dumpsite into a mega-landfill – a project with a high potential to pollute their water. It was a pitched battle that started in 1985 and lasted for decades. They encountered many obstacles – some from their own government –as they fought together to protect their water. In 2006, the government terminated the proposed expansion. It looks tentatively like the battle has been won but to this day water contamination issues remained unresolved. About the Speaker: Poh-Gek Forkert, Queen’s University Poh-Gek Forkert came to Queen’s in 1982 after postdoctoral training in the United States. She is a research scientist and toxicologist who has published more than eighty papers and book chapters on the disposition and metabolism of toxic chemicals. For the past ten years, she has worked as an expert consultant with environmental lawyers and citizen groups and has testified at public hearings of the Environmental Review Tribunal. She is Professor Emerita at Queen’s University. Her book Fighting Dirty has recently been shortlisted for the Speaker’s Book Continue Reading

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The Growth and Development of Chinese NGOs Domestically and Abroad, and its Implications for International Development

Date: October 10, 2019Venue: Mackintosh-Corry Hall, D214Time: 1:00 PM – 2:30 PMSpeaker:  Reza Hasmath, University of Alberta This talk looks at the strategies Chinese NGOs employ to survive and operate in an authoritarian institutional environment. What happens when Chinese NGOs that are born and socialized in such a domestic context, “go out” to other jurisdictions with similar or varying regime types? Finally, I will suggest that the internationalization of Chinese NGOs will foster a more pluralized global civil society. Ultimately, this will require us to rethink salient precepts and practices in international development. 

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