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Legal Geographies of Global Vaccine (In)Equity

Join SNID for a panel discussion about intellectual property rights and global vaccine (in)equity. Our speakers will discuss: how transnational trade law and the World Trade Organization’s TRIPS (Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights) shape the availability, pricing, and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines; the proposed TRIPS waiver and its potential impact on vaccine equity; and […]

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Vaccine Equity in Canada: A Conversation with Celina Caesar-Chavannes.

In this season launch of Studies in National and International Development, Celina Caesar-Chavannes presents a talk on vaccine equity in Canada. Caesar-Chavannes is a business consultant, coach and international speaker, who currently serves part time as the Sr. Advisor, EDI Initiatives and Adjunct Lecturer at Queen’s University. Her new memoir, “Can You Hear Me Now?” […]

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Translation and 20th Century Intellectual History in Latin America

María Constanza Guzmán The author of Mapping Spaces of Translation in Twentieth-Century Latin American Print Culture discusses her investigation of the interplay of translation and Latin American intellectual history in the 20th century. She reflects on translation in 20th-century Latin American print culture, tracing the trajectory of influential periodicals and publishing houses from the 60s and 70s. […]

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The Horn of Africa in Crisis: The war in Tingray and Forced Migration

In early November 2020, a civil war broke out in Ethiopia that quickly turned into a humanitarian crisis. The raging conflict, involving neighboring Eritrea, risks destabilizing the whole Horn of Africa region. It jeopardized the safety of more than 90,000 Eritrean refugees in the Tigray region of Ethiopia, and displaced hundreds of thousands of Tigrayans […]

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Mutual Aid: Covid -19 and Beyond

Join SNID for a panel discussion about the role of grassroots movements and local activism during COVID-19 with Jade Da Costa of The People’s Pantry (Toronto/Tkaronto), Tom deGrey of the Downtown Eastside SRO Collaborative (Vancouver/Unceded Coast Salish Territory), Queen’s Post-Doctoral Fellow in Geography and Planning Dani Aiello, and Liz Turner of Mutual Aid Katarokwi (Kingston/Katarokwi). […]

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Dr. Scott Rutherford on The Histories of ‘Red Power’ in Canada

This episode features a presentation by Dr. Scott Rutherford (Queen’s University).  He discusses the histories of “Red Power” in Canada within a broader context of global anti-colonial and anti-racist movements of the 1960s and early 1970s. He attempts to make sense of the complicated ways that global reference points were used to describe local protests; […]

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Educating Artists in 2020: What the Pandemic has Taught Us

The pandemic has magnified many issues that we face as a society, including post-secondary programming in the arts, including music. Post-secondary music programs have been criticized in recent years for their lack of equity and diversity, a problem that is undeniably systemic. Changes to post-secondary curricula need to better reflect a diversity of arts-making and […]

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Facets of uneven development in the European border regime: The economic geographies of migrant camps in Greece

In the aftermath of the so-called “refugee crisis” of 2015-16, the migration regime consolidating in Europe entails the management of newcoming populations through their accommodation in camps. This talk will account for neglected aspects of this process in the case of Greece, focusing on the everyday economic practices, interactions and networks emerging in, around and […]

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Constellations: Eternity Martis

Kingston Frontenac Public Library, The Black Luck Collective, and Queen’s SNID are pleased to present Eternity Martis, author of the enlightening memoir, They Said This Would Be Fun. A booksmart kid from Toronto, Eternity Martis was excited to move away to Western University for her undergraduate degree. But as one of the few Black students […]

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Uncle Tom and the Politics of Loyalty: The Mutation of a Literary Character into a Racial Epithet, 1852 to Present

In this first podcast of the new Studies in National and International Development 2020-21 year, Dr. Chery Thompson leads the discussion.  Dr. Thompson explores the mutation of Uncle Tom from 19th C. literary character to the relentless reworking of Uncle Tom into a nostalgic racial metaphor with the power to shape how we see Black […]

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